Dear reader,

We are now live at www.skycat.pro. The development project continues, and updates are added to this blog in random intervals.

We have parachutes launchers available in many weight ranges; optimal 1 - 6 kg and these could be extended with higher impact level up to 11 kg. For larger up to 23 kg multicopters we have XL - series with pilot chute principle.

For those who wants to digest all information available of products, we have left this blog as it is. This blog follows closely main steps we have gone through while developing parachute launcher. Blog might feel like Do It Yourself kind and to be honest, in the beginning it was.

After hundreds of hours thinking, designing, prototyping and testing our patent pending launcher turned to be the most reliable parachute launcher for professional use. We have searched all possible boundaries of technology and from this blog you'll find results of these successful tests but also not so successful tests.

You never know where The final limit of technology is without experiencing it. That's the reason why we have done tests for scenarios which might not be even realistic on flight.

For production versions of Skycat we could proudly to say that we have experienced zero mishaps, never failed a single eject and parachute has deployed every time. This includes rescue scenarios with every imaginable scenario copter could face in air. Check this out as one sample of our test sessions! 

Skycat parachute launcher has been tested beyond all imaginable abuses copter possibly could experience in flight. We have sink it to water, it has been heated hours to 90°C and exposed to extensive moisture, we have frosted, defrosted and frosted it again, it has been in mud and snow and still it has worked. Same overshooting tests we have done also for electronics. This is not promise you can use our products outside of submarine but we have tested it so :)

This blog will still be updated as well our Facebook pages www.facebook.com/skycat.pro and Twitter at https://twitter.com/skycatpro

Fly safe - Let's keep our copters flying!

Henri

Skycat.pro

 

DJI Inspire 1 / Skycat X55-CF parachute integration by www.remotevision.ch:

Other documentary videos:

Skycat Twin test session

OPENTX for parachute eject and 6POS switch

DUAL spring loaded switches - single RC channel for parachute eject...

Brake enabled SimonK firmware

Ground eject demonstration in slow motion 

Water test

Aerial test No 2 for Opale Paramodels 2.5m^2 parachute 

Aerial test No 1 Opale Paramodels 1.8m^2 parachute 

A moment of deploy

Tower test 3

Tower test 2

 

Manufacturers contributed to this project:

- http://www.opale-paramodels.com/

http://www.fruitychutes.com

- www.vectorheli.com

- www.3drobotics.com

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Gene,

7.9" inch is about 80mm more than tube free space is now. I'm wondering if it is too much. 4kg-4.1m/s is very close to Opale 4m2 (4kg-4.0m/s) parachute. It would be perfect to have this size parachute to this tube because it results about 5.5m/s descent speed for 7kg multicopter (DJI S800). This was speed that our test copter experienced when we dropped it seven times in one day.

When parachute has first folds and is like a long rod, how many times you fold it then? We have folded 2.5m2 parachute five times so that packet is about 120mm long. Four folds require less diameter but longer tube. All folds we made were Z - folds.

Gene,

These dimensions are taken from 2,5m2 parachute:

63"/160cm

30"/75cm

Gene,

This image series represents how we have packed Opale Paramodels 2.5m2 parachute in to our eject tube. I guess 4.0m2 parachute might fit if we use only four folds on final stage instead of these five. 6m2 parachute did fit using three folds but it was way too long packet.

Would you try how your IFC-60 packs if you follow these steps and use four final folds?

Cloth liner you use made of proper material might be better than paper because it could be used for tightening a packet. Paper tears easily if it is used for tightening.

I think I converted the length wrong;) It's 4.72" which sounds better. Z-folding is the right way to do it, and you adjust the number of folds to get the proper length.  That is exactly correct.

-G

Great photos. So the chute is 10 gores.  Can you measure very accurately the distance between two shroud lines?  I can then calculate the number I'm looking for.

Can you tell if the canopy sections (aka gores) are curved at all, or are they straight?  They look straight telling me this is a conical shape that is then pulled down.

 It would be good to see the line attachment points up close, the bridle where all the lines come to, and the top pull down connection.  It looks like they do not reinforce the connections.

Thanks for doing this!

-Gene

How far off is "parachute" library? Will it be available for fixed wing?

very easy to make your own parachutes to, on youtube look up experimentalairlines

I hope to have the parachute library released as part of AC3.2.  That's the next big copter release but we don't have an ETA on it yet.  It'll be up to Tridge & Co on the plane side about when to incorporate it into plane...Tridge certainly has his hands full with many things.

Now latest drop test video is uploaded to Youtube and it is linked to header of this blog. Video contains only one drop because it ended to tree. 

Today we planned to test again but wind is even stronger than last time. So we need to wait for proper weather and time. Next time we might be able to show some more parachute sizes as Opale Paramodels 4.0m^2 and Fruity Chutes parachute selected by Gene is coming.

Emery,

That's interesting way to manufacture parachutes at home and very fast way to do it.

Anyway, gluing and parachute doesn't sounds most reliable combination for heavier flying machines. For dropping smaller items from a plane as they demonstrated might be fine.

Opale Paramodels 4.0m2 parachute just arrived. Thanks to guys at Opale Paramodels, stock were out of parachutes but they called one parachute back from a reseller for our tests!

This parachute packs exactly in to same sized tube without any changes but is very tight. Although it fits we need to shoot it several times to be sure it really comes out every time without hesitation. This parachute needed very very tight packing with 5 folds as we used with 2.5m2 and 1.8m2 parachutes and is clearly close to the limit. Using 4 folds packing is easier and worth to try as well. It would require about 3cm longer tube.

Total system weight of this 4.0m2 parachute in tube will be  420gr-470gr. Size is about the same than PINT beer can.

Referential descent rates would be approximately like this based on one online calculator (http://www.onlinetesting.net/cgi-bin/descent3.3.cgi):

5kg 4.5
6kg 4.9
7kg 5.3
8kg 5.7
9kg 6.0
10kg 6.3


This is quick screen capture from a video of testing:


 

Cool Henri! When looking at how you have to pack the chute keep in mind that many people using these chutes will not have the skill needed to achieve a very tight pack.  So as you probably already know for this size chute, having a tube slightly longer and making it easier to pack means a better chance of success!

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