Hi all,

I know that this is a very recurrent question and I apologise for any redundancy.

I assembled recently a Tarot T960 frame, T-Motor MT3514 400 (X6), T-Motor ESC 40a (X6), emax 6 axis power board, Pixhawk, 3DR GPS module(X2), 3DR telemetry radio, RC Taranis X9E and receiver X6R.

I managed to get it airborne during first trial, but unfortunately, one of my props was not tight enough and came off in the middle of a flight. The hexa landed with the arm missing the prop, which obviously broke. It also inutilise one of the land gear arms.

After getting the spares and assembly the hexa again, it doesn't want to fly. Instead, it flips as the video shows.

Any ideas on what could be wrong?

Yes, props are all spinning correctly, motors seem to have the same speed, no weird noises, frame set to X shape, etc.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_iZNL5M2cKIU2dxN0FqMHNZZ28/view?u...

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As a hint, you can assign channel 6 (the pot/knob that turns round on your RC) to rate roll/pitch in APM planner/MP.  Then when you take off if it oscillates wildly you can very quickly use the knob to change your rate values, to the right will make it oscillate more wildly, to the left less wildly but too much left and it will feel 'drunk' and respond to your commands very slowly.  If you get it vaguely right, good enough to keep it in a hover, then you can start an autotune and let it tune itself - usually much better than you'll achieve yourself.

What could possibly go wrong with 6 razor sharp carbon fibre blades spinning at many thousand rpms inches from your eyes and major arteries?  If you're auditioning for a darwin award this is a great idea :)

Wow, this sounds like quite a first project!  What's the frame?  A picture might help.

Bent arms/props certainly won't help but I'd be surprised if that was causing wild oscillations.

To be fair, this is exactly what I've just seen the wiki tells newbie pilots to do:

http://copter.ardupilot.com/wiki/ac_tipsfornewpilots/

I'm absolutely staggered by this, it seems the absolute height of irresponsible advice.  To tell newbie pilots who aren't sure what they're doing, with a copter that is behaving erractically or unpredictably to hold it while hitting the throttle..  I cannot believe this is in the wiki!

Hi Fnoop,

It's a Tarot T960 (almost a meter in diameter), Motors are 400 kv, and props are 16"X5.4.

I also think that this might not be the sole cause of all this performance. What else comes up to your mind?

Yes, motors twisted or/and  umbalance props can make a horrible performance.

Is this the first copter you are building? If so I would say that a 1m diameter 16inch prop beast is a bit ambitious for a first build. Why not try a small 250 or 300mm 'mini' quad or hex as first project to learn how these things work.

Hold the copter firmly in your hand and level in the air and with the props clear of your body, advance the throttle a bit to get a feel for what’s going on.

This has helped me many times to quickly and directly obtain an answer to the problem. The recommendation has been included in the manual for many years. Previously, it has also stood "over your head".

If you have come so far that you have managed to build you own drone, managed hand saw, drill, soldering iron (and perhaps a knife and fork?) Then this is not a problem. Your life is your own responsibility. All activities in your life can potentially kill you if you do not have judgment and knowledge. Can you ride a bike?

fnoop dog get out of here.. insulting others " thats a horrible idea blah blah", then not giving any reasonable advice is just TROLLING !!

His motors are not flat.. exactly what i suggested earlier..

@ hans i totally agree with you. Common sense is the safest practice...

Holding a quad above your head is dangerous.. sure then dont build quads because flying them is EVEN MORE DANGEROUS !!

such nonsese..

I have done this.  I'd only recommend it for smaller vehicles, Arnoldo's is too big.  It's a pretty good method to check if your roll pitch and yaw respond correctly in stabilize.  But don't accidentally bump the throttle, or you'll probably break your vehicle and maybe cut yourself.

Oh yes I remember who you are now, you got on your high horse the last time I tried to offer some advice you didn't agree with..

So let me get this straight, someone who is clearly novice with this platform comes in with a malfunctioning/flipping *meter size* UAV with 6 *16"* carbon-fibre props, you advise them to hold it above their head and gun the throttle, and when I dare to suggest this is a bad idea (which it is), I'm a troll?  Oki doki.

I have offered him reasonable advice.  Whether or not it's correct, at least I'm trying..

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