I was so pleased to find your group.

I use a Taranis radio, which can use Japan communication frequencies for telemetry and ship control.  But what do smart RC fliers in Japan use for:

- Radio Control (Taranis?  Which one? Link?)

- UAV RC Receiver for that radio (Which one? Link?)

- UAV Telemetry Radio (for talking to Mission Planner or other computer software; Link?)

- Computer Telemetry Radio (for talking to Mission Planner or other computer software; Link?)

Looking for quality, light weight, and certified to fly in Japan.

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Hi Forrest. Do you have any plan to visit Japan? or You have already come to Japan. Anyway, very well come:-)

Here is regulation for radio communication,Telec. http://www.telec.or.jp/eng/

Your equipment needs to be certified by Telec. Then the Taranis may not possible to use.

If you bring Futaba and JR controller that has been purchased in other country, please check Telec logo on it.

Easy way is getting RC system in Japan. Purchase or rent from your Japanese friend.

Futaba or JR are generally use in Japan.

The use of telemetry is problematic for regulation and capability.

The easy option is xBee and Bluetooth.

As you know, we have Aviation low that is regulate Drones and small fly thing, over 200 gram.

You can not fly Parrot or DJI in Tokyo metropolitan without permission.

Please contact me any help to visit Japan.

Thank you Jiro.  Very informative.

We are preparing a commercial drone system for use in Japan.  My associate Jake, might ask more questions later if that is OK.

Hi Forrest,

> - Radio Control (Taranis?  Which one? Link?)

Most people I know use Futaba or JR. I see some Walkera users too, but as Hattori-san mentioned, Taranis has not been certified for use in Japan, so it would be illegal. I personally love Taranis, but I don't use it in Japan. If you absolutely need to use Taranis, one way to do it legally is to put a certified transmitter module in the back and disable the onboard radio. As you may know, Taranis can take JR-style modules and there are certified modules out there.

Amongst professional pilots using Pixhawk, Futaba T14SG or T18SZ are very popular.

http://www.futabarc.com/systems/futk9410-14sg/index.html

However, the Japanese version has region fixed to Japan (10mw max outuput, with telec certification). Not sure about the units purchased overseas, but you probably won't be able to change it. You can check the region in the system info menu. So, your best bet is to purchase the system in Japan. The user interface language can be changed to English.

> - UAV RC Receiver for that radio (Which one? Link?)

If you decide to go with Futaba and use Pixhawk's S.BUS input, I'd recommend R6303SB.
http://www.futabarc.com/receivers/air.html
R7303SB is not recommended as it is bi-directional (it sends Futaba proprietary telemetry back to the transmitter) and wastes bandwidth, and Futaba telemetry is not customizable/extendable like FrSky's.

> - UAV Telemetry Radio (for talking to Mission Planner or other computer software; Link?)

> - Computer Telemetry Radio (for talking to Mission Planner or other computer software; Link?)

As Hattori-san mentioned, XBee or long range Bluetooth modules are pretty much the only options here (both roughly have 1km LoS range). 433MHz and 915MHz radios are illegal in Japan.

If you use XBee, be sure to purchase international version of XBee modules as the US version emits stronger signal (more than the maximum 10mW allowed) and are not certified for use in Japan. Please note that the certification is for the entire module, including the antenna, so it's technically illegal to replace the stock antenna with a higher gain one.

Again, your safest option is to purchase the modules and antenna in Japan. Here's a link to the online store I buy my modules from. Not sure if they have English version of the site.

https://www.switch-science.com/catalog/list/7/

For short range applications, I sometimes use WiFi too, but these modules have to be certified as well.

Also, you can get certification on individual unit, provided that the unit meets RF emission requirements. You need to send the unit, along with proper documentation including schematics, to the certification authority. If it passes, they'll give you a sticker to put on the device. If the volume is large, it's better to get certification on the design instead. This way, you can avoid sending every unit to them to be certified.

Let me know if you need help sourcing any of these, or have any other questions.

Cheers,

Goro

Hi guys,

this is very late, 3 years from last post  - but do you know how easy is to certify RX module only (compare to TX or TRX) in Japan?

Is it possible to certify the OEM module only or you need to certify entire device (drone, receiver box, etc.)?

Is there a certification labs in Japan that do this and are OK to communicate in English?

I am reading Japan Radio Law and MIC documents, but it seems it will be not an easy task.

Thanks in advance!

Hi Dimitar,

If the module is purely a receiver (i.e. it does not emit any radio signal), then there's no need to get it certified.

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