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3D Robotics

Update--6/11

  1. I've updated the GeoCrawler 2 (Lego UAV) instruction page. It now has a list of steps and parts necessary to complete the compass-sensor version of the UAV. The GPS version software is still in development. That should be ready later this summer.
  2. I've switched GeoCrawler 1 (Picopilot UAV) to a more appropriate airframe. It's now flying on a Mini-Telemaster (shown), which is an inherently stable 3-channel trainer. We may someday move back to the Predator airframe, but we need to ensure the autopilot is rock-solid before putting it in a more challenging airframe.
  3. Development on GeoCrawler 3 (cellphone-based UAV) is now in the alpha software stage. The code is able to control the servo and read the GPS coordinates from the phone. Now working on parsing the SMS command set and turning heading information into rudder commands. At a later stage we'll incorporate a GPS-based altitude hold by using the phone to control the throttle as well. Yes, I know GPS altitude readings are pretty approximate, but if you average them over time it's good enough for the +-10m that we need.
  4. I'm working on a new pan-tilt gimbal for GeoCrawler 1. Because the plane is smaller than GeoCrawler 2, it will be made out of aluminum and modeled after this simple Lynxmotion design (but for micro servos, not standard size)
  5. We lost our flying field at the Alameda airfield due to environmental remediation. Now scouting new airfields in the Bay Area.
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3D Robotics

Lego Autopilot first flight

My kids and I actually had the first successful test flight of the sub-$1,000 UAV two weekends ago, but I haven't had time to edit the video properly until now. The good news is that a) it didn't crash, and b) it works. We tested stabilization, autonomous navigation (only using compass headings this time, although GPS is in the works), and the real-time video downlink. Everything worked well enough that we're able to see what we have to improve, which is the definition of a successful test.

Just as a reminder, this is a R/C plane that's been modded into a proper drone. It's got a Lego Mindstorms NXT autopilot, a Lego pan-tilt camera, and an infrared autostalization system.

Here are some video clips from that flight (we're still getting the hang of filming a small plane in flight, so please forgive the distance and shakiness, too): The only thing you can kind of make out about the flight characteristics in the brief part where the you can see the plane in the air is the distinctive "crabbing" behavior as the autostabilized ailerons fight the autopilot-steered rudder. This is normal and is just an artifact of the way I designed it, with stabilization and navigation as two separate systems that don't communicate with each other. It still turns as intended, it's just a little graceless about it.

Finally, a word on why we're doing this.

The main aim of this project is to both make the world's cheapest full-featured UAV and the first one designed to be within the reach of high school and below kids, as a platform for an aerial robotics contest. Like the Lego FIRST league, but in the air.

But there is another aim, which I ended being asked about a lot at Maker Faire. At the moment the FAA regulations on UAVs are ambiguous (we believe that by staying below 400 feet and within line-of-sight we're within them). But there is a good deal of concern that as small and cheap UAVs become more common, the FAA will toughen the rules, making activities such as ours illegal. I hope this project will illustrate why that approach won't work.

By creating a UAV with Lego parts and built in part by kids, we haven't just created a minimum UAV, we've created a reductio ad absurdum one. If children can make UAVs out of toys, the genie is out of the bottle. Clear use guidelines (such as staying below 400 feet and away from tall buildings) would be welcome, but blanket bans or requirements for explicit FAA approval for each launch will be too hard to enforce. The day when there was a limited "UAV industry" that could be regulated are gone.

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3D Robotics

First test flight

May 13th, first test flight of both the Lego UAV and the stealth "minimum" UAV at Alameda Naval Air Station. Video coming soon.

'
Subsytems tested:

--Flight stabilization: Worked. a little rocking, but nothing too serious
--Autopilot: Sort of worked. Rudder throw needs to be increased. Heading change induced expected counter force by stabalization, which increased rocking. As a result the turning was very gradual. That needs to be faster
--Video: Ground team forgot to raise the receiver antenna, so signal was weak except when the UAV was overhead.

Miminum UAV:

Ony tested airframe and stabilization. Airframe flew normally. Stabalization induced strong down elevator and aileron deflection, despite multiple calibration attempts. Something either wrong with set up or hardware.
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3D Robotics
Hla114

Description: This UAV, which uses an off-the-shelf autopilot, is the reference platform against which we benchmark the more innovative (and cheaper) custom UAVs that are our main focus at DIY Drones.

The video system listed below, which streams realtime video via a 2.4 GhZ wireless link, provides a real-time eye-in-the sky overhead view of the path, although a FlyCamOne2 is a cheaper and lighter video solution if you don't mind waiting till you land to download the video. Alternately, this is a reasonable platform for Geomapping (very high resolution aerial photography that you can use with Google Earth) with a commercial digital point-and-shoot camera shooting in continuous mode, accompanied by a GPS logger.

The Mini Telemaster is relatively small and has a pretty high wing-loading, so the onboard camera equipment it can carry is limited, both in size and weight (it's ideally suited for the tiny FlyCamOne). The advantage is that you can hand launch it almost anywhere, so no runway is required. But a more serious imaging system requires the shift to a larger plane, such as the full-size Electro Telemaster.

Features: Up to 32 pre-set GPS waypoints. Integrated inertial stabilization. Tried and true system, which offers reliability in exchange for limited flexibility.

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Hacked E-mails Fuel Climate Change Skeptics

Hundreds of private e-mails and documents hacked from a computer server at a British university are causing a stir among global warming skeptics, who say they show that climate scientists conspired to overstate the case for a human influence on climate change.The e-mails, attributed to prominent American and British climate researchers, include discussions of scientific data and whether it should be released, exchanges about how best to combat the arguments of skeptics, and casual comments — in some cases derisive — about specific people known for their skeptical views. Drafts of scientific papers and a photo collage, portraying climate skeptics on an ice floe, were also among the hacked data.In one e-mail exchange, a scientist writes of using a statistical “trick” in a chart illustrating a recent sharp warming trend. In another, a scientist refers to climate skeptics as “idiots.”Some skeptics asserted Friday that the correspondence showed a effort to withhold scientific information. “This is not a smoking gun, this is a mushroom cloud,” said Patrick J. Michaels, a climatologist who has long faulted evidence pointing to human-driven warming and is criticized in the documents.Portions of the correspondence portrays the scientists as feeling under siege by the skeptics’ camp and worried that any stray comment or data glitch could be turned against them.The cache of e-mails also includes references to journalists, including this reporter, and queries from journalists related to articles they were reporting.Officials at the University of East Anglia confirmed in a statement released on Friday that files had been stolen from a university server and that the police had been brought in to investigate the breach. They added, however, that they could not confirm that all the material circulating on the Internet was authentic.But several scientists and others contacted by the Times confirmed that they were the authors or recipients of specific e-mails included in the file.The revelations are bound to inflame the public debate as hundreds of negotiators prepare to hammer out an international climate accord at meetings in Copenhagen next month, and at least one scientist speculated that the timing was not coincidental.The documents will undoubtedly raise questions about the quality of research on some specific questions and the actions of some scientists. But the evidence pointing to a growing human contribution to global warming is so broad and deep that the hacked material is unlikely to erode the overall argument.In several e-mail exchanges, Kevin Trenberth, a climatologist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other scientists discussed whether a string of recent years of relatively stable temperatures undermined scientific models that predict long-term warming.“The fact is that we can’t account for the lack of warming at the moment and it is a travesty that we can’t,” Dr. Trenberth wrote.Other scientists went on to rebut him, saying that the fluctuations were not inconsistent with a continuing warming trend.Dr. Trenberth said Friday that he was appalled at the release of the e-mails, which he said were private discussions.But he added that he thought the revelations might backfire against climate skeptics. If anything, he said, he thought that the messages showed “the integrity of scientists.”Still, some of the comments might lend themselves to sinister interpretations.In a 1999 e-mail exchange about charts showing climate patterns over the last two millennia, Phil Jones, a longtime climate researcher at the East Anglia climate center, said he had used a “trick” employed by another scientist, Michael Mann, to “hide a decline” in temperatures.Dr. Mann, a professor at Pennsylvania State, confirmed in an interview that the e-mail was real but said the choice of words was poor. The term “trick” referred to a technical adjustment that was standard procedure and did not affect the results, he said.“It sounds incriminating, but when you look at what you’re talking about, there’s nothing there,” Dr. Mann said.Dr. Jones, writing in an e-mail, declined to be interviewed and pasted in attached the university’s statement.Stephen McIntyre, a blogger who has for years been using his Web site, climateaudit.org, to challenge data used to chart climate patterns and came in for heated criticism in some e-mails, called the revelations “quite breathtaking.”But several scientists whose names appear repeatedly in the e-mails said they merely revealed that scientists are human beings, and did nothing to undercut the body of research on global warming.“Science doesn’t work because we’re all nice,” said Gavin A. Schmidt, a climatologist at NASA whose e-mail exchanges with colleagues over a variety of recent climate studies were included in the cache. “Newton may have been an ass, but the theory of gravity still works.”He said the breach at the University of East Anglia was discovered after hackers who had gained access to the correspondence sought Tuesday to hack into a different server supporting realclimate.org, a blog unrelated to NASA that he runs with several other scientists pressing the case for global warming.The intruders sought to create a mock blog post there and to upload the full batch of files from Britain – nearly 200 megabytes’ worth.That effort was thwarted, Dr. Schmidt said, and scientists immediately notified colleagues at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia. Nearly all the material in the hacked files, which quickly spread to a variety of ?servers, originated with or was sent to climate scientists at the school.The first posts that revealed details from the files appeared on Thursday at The Air Vent, a Web site devoted to skeptics arguments. Almost instantly readers there and elsewhere began posting excerpts that they felt illustrated scientific bias or dishonesty.At first, said Dr. Michaels, the climatologist who has faulted some of the science undergirding the global warming consensus, his instinct was to ignore the correspondence as “just the way scientists talk.”But on Friday, he said, after reading more deeply, he felt that some exchanges reflected a concerted effort to block the release of data for independent review.He said that some e-mails mused about a way to discredit him by challenging the veracity of his doctoral dissertation at the University of Wisconsin by claiming he knew his research was wrong.“This shows these are people willing to bend rules and go after other people’s reputations in very serious ways,” he said.

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(These analysis has still room for improvement, it will be resolved by the computer evolution. and I heard a humor of Tesla Motors that Model S Easter egg turns car into submarine. So In the next step, I'll show the biomechanical fish fins which can replace the conventional screw propellers. It useful for the unmanned underwater vehicles. 

As well as I'll study the structural design from the American railway locomotive industry before the physical implementation.)

Details :

Already a lot of people were surprised to this wing mechanism.
I observed their reaction, and understand the importance.
In the academic field, it was a discovery become crazy.

Now, I talk a truth about these ideas a little.
But, it is what hard to imagine.

Vortices inherently create drag. we can understand that with as the Cardoid curve movement, our formula (later mention) generate a symmetric vortex street pattern, unlike the Karman vortex street. and animal machine can recapture some of this energy and use it to improve speed and maneuverability.

This wing mechanism is attributed to some biomechanical techniques from Wing Chun Kung Fu. (This martial art was invented by observing the movement of white crane which was fighting against snake.)

1) Bong Sao (A.K.A. Wing Arm)
2) Tan Sao (Dispersing Arm)
3) Gan Sao (Cultivating Arm)
4) Luk Dim Boon Gwun (Long Pole)

I'm learning the above arts from an european-styled exercise method called "Wing Tjun" and Donnie Yen's IP Man movies series.

3689694680?profile=original

 


As well as, that fundamental geometric formula of voluntary movement has been attributed to the oriental philosophy in Tai Chi Chuan.

1) Yin and Yang (Dark—Bright)
2) Bagua (Eight trigrams)

I got an opportunity to learn about the above internal arts in Switzerland from a Tai Chi master Cornelia Gruber through a german-styled board game that she made. She studied Tai Chi Chuan from a grand master Bow Sim Mark (Donnie Yen's mother) in Boston.

3689694657?profile=original

[ EJ Marey ]

I research the voluntary movement of animals using the motion picture. this is a method started by a physiologist Étienne-Jules Marey in the 19th century in France. He took the world's first motion capture of birds while inventing a chronophotographic gun. Then his observation studies has led to the development of aerial vehicles by Étienne Œhmichen's quad copters and Louis Charles Breguet's Gyro planes. (Muybridge took a motion pictures of horses locomotion. his work is more known. despite it was for dullsville gambling. lol)

[ OEhmichen ]

[ Breguet ]

3689694787?profile=original

I also study European Horology. in this way, I can discuss about the movement of machine animals from the field of astronomy, space physics. this approach leads to the following studies
self-organization, dissipative structure theory, fluid dynamics as like as turbulence or tourbillon, discrete optimisation, collective intelligence... these are also closely related to the artificial intelligence development.

Amazon CEO which hopes to practical use of the drone for business, Jeff Bezos has a project to create an astronomical clock called The Clock of the Long Now, also called the 10,000-year clock. Someone of his project noticed immediately after I have published a mathematical formula of the voluntary movement on the web. their presented surreptitiously it in the blog of the Long Now. I called them, but does not reply. Before dozens of years from now, after the French Amazon was opened, I took their delivery service for get valuable books needed to start my project. It became a big opportunity. then I received a tiny gift and a letter of Jeff Bezos for the sake of gratitude of understanding to new business.

[ Books ]

In 2012-2015, all activities related to my

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Cape Productions Offers Novel Drone Video Service

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http://www.bigwhite.com/passholders/drone-session-contest/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SP+-+March+18&utm_content=SP+-+March+18+CID_45b387d3f9aeb7aeff87bcbc0959cc6b&utm_source=StickyMail&utm_term=Drone%20Video%20Infomation%20%20Enter%20to%20Win

This just popped up on a Canadian Commercial Operator Facebook group and we're discussing the implications and legal possibilities.  Apparently the operator claims that this has been cleared with Transport Canada, but nobody is sure yet what the details of that are.

This does not appear to fit in with existing commercial regulations.  It seems unlikely that a commercial operator would be able to get a permit to fly in a crowded area like a ski hill.  I have taken a guess as to what is going on here:

The operator is not operating the drone.  They are renting drones to recreational users.  Not much different than selling drones to recreational users.  The user is the pilot in command, not a commercial operator.  The user captures images of himself.  Then the operator edits the footage.  It would bypass all of the commercial regulations.  Some disagree that this would be legally possible, but I don't see why it would not.

Currently, a person can rent a Uhaul truck, without being required to possess a commercial truck license.  And I think it would be over-reaching if the government tried to stop a person from paying somebody to edit footage for them, no matter how it was captured.

The kediydrones.com

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Cape Productions offers novel Drone Video Service

X8_Top.jpg?1393194708

http://www.bigwhite.com/passholders/drone-session-contest/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SP+-+March+18&utm_content=SP+-+March+18+CID_45b387d3f9aeb7aeff87bcbc0959cc6b&utm_source=StickyMail&utm_term=Drone%20Video%20Infomation%20%20Enter%20to%20Win

This just popped up on a Canadian Commercial Operator Facebook group and we're discussing the implications and legal possibilities.  Apparently the operator claims that this has been cleared with Transport Canada, but nobody is sure yet what the details of that are.

Read more…

Cape Productions offers novel Drone Video Service

X8_Top.jpg?1393194708

http://www.bigwhite.com/passholders/drone-session-contest/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=SP+-+March+18&utm_content=SP+-+March+18+CID_45b387d3f9aeb7aeff87bcbc0959cc6b&utm_source=StickyMail&utm_term=Drone%20Video%20Infomation%20%20Enter%20to%20Win

This just popped up on a Canadian Commercial Operator Facebook group and we're discussing the implications and legal possibilities.  Apparently the operator claims that this has been cleared with Transport Canada, but nobody is sure yet what the details of tha

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3D Robotics

Agricultural research at Montana State

DSC_0085-300x178.jpg?width=550Dr. Charlie Rush and Montana State graduate student Ian Johnson have been using the 3DR Y6 for some foundational disease detection and prevention research. Their project aims use aerial imagery to detect wheat crop diseases. These pest-caused diseases can lead to poor water uptake by the diseased wheat, and ultimately wasted water and wasted money.  Here's the full story from Agrilife:

Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, skledbetter@ag.tamu.edu
Contact: Dr. Charlie Rush, 806-354-5804, crush@ag.tamu.edu

AM

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3D Robotics

DSC_0085-300x178.jpg?width=550Dr. Charlie Rush and Montana State graduate student Ian Johnson have been using the 3DR Y6 for some foundational agricultural disease detection and prevention research. Their project aims use aerial imagery to detect wheat crop diseases. These pest-caused what viruses can lead to poor water uptake, and ultimately wasted water and wasted money.  Here's the full story from Agrilife:

Writer: Kay Ledbetter, 806-677-5608, skledbetter@ag.tamu.edu
Contact: Dr. Charlie Rush, 806-354-5804, crush@ag.tamu.edu

AMARILLO – Dr. Charlie Rush hopes to use a unique method – helicopter drone – to track disease progression across wheat fields to eventually help producers make better irrigation decisions.

A helicopter drone is being used by Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife plant pathologist in Amarillo, to track disease progression across wheat fields. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter)

A helicopter drone is being used by Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife plant pathologist in Amarillo, to track disease progression across wheat fields. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter)

Rush, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant pathologist in Amarillo, has enlisted the help of Ian Johnson, a Montana State University-Bozeman graduate student who is using his work in the university’s Science and Natural History Filmmaking Program to help scientists conduct research.

Approximately 1.1 million acres of wheat in the High Plains are irrigated, Rush said, making wheat the second-largest user of irrigation water from the Ogallala Aquifer. In this same region, mite-vectored virus diseases are the predominant pathogenic constraint to sustainable wheat production each year.

The viruses causing these diseases are transmitted by the wheat curl mite, he said. Infected wheat plants not only have reduced grain and forage yields, but also greatly reduced root weight and water-use efficiency. Therefore, fertilizer and groundwater applied as irrigation to diseased wheat is largely wasted.

Rush’s team is using the helicopter to take remote images of a field study where they are trying to develop an economic threshold for irrigation of wheat infected with wheat streak and other mite-vectored diseases.

A helicopter drone used by Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife plant pathologist in Amarillo, flies over a wheat field to track disease progression. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter)

A helicopter drone used by Dr. Charlie Rush, Texas A&M AgriLife plant pathologist in Amarillo, flies over a wheat field to track disease progression. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kay Ledbetter)

“The problem for farmers is that these diseases develop in gradients over time and they don’t know whether or not they should apply new pesticides or fertilizers or water,” he said. “Most of these practices are done in April, and that is when the disease is just starting to show up. They may know they have disease in the field, but they really don’t know how much damage it might cause.

“So what we are trying to do is be able to go in early in the season and look at the disease development at a particular time and then based on what it looks like, say in early April, be able to give them a prediction of what the crop will be at harvest time.”

To do that, Rush said his team has been going into the field using different types of remote imaging, such as the hand-held hyperspectral radiometer, to measure and quantify the severity of disease development in the field.

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Developer

freepilot.png

 

I want to share my journey of designing a drone in India, start to finish, hopefully for cheap and mainly built from recycled items to keep the costs down.

I started this project as a free-time project, but I would like to carry it on as a mainstream project with help from you guys.

My aim is to keep the costs down as I am only 13 years old and its a bit difficult for me to spend a lot of money on shipping,etc.

Plans:

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