Everything was normal with the landing. For a long time, we noticed a lot of airplanes coming real close. Then right near the runway he firewalled the throttle & pulled up harder than any commercial pilot ever did. Thought he came in too low, aborted & we were probably going to die like our aunt. Thought about Major Marcy harder than we ever did before as the Air bus roared & fought for altitude.

As we rose above the clouds, it became clear we weren't going to be destroyed, it really was an aborted landing, & it was probably a near miss. Got a photo right before the abort & right after, containing the offending aircraft. The pilot announced it was a near miss but tried to play it down.



This was right before the abort. Was thinking how big our neighbor looked when...



Real steep angle of attack & full throttle. Those flaps retracted faster than we ever saw.


Makes you wonder what autonomous passenger planes will be like. The pilot said the panic climb was a standard maneuver in response to a computer warning & not a human call.

Suspect there would be a lot more panic aborts if a computer was unconditionally responding to radar. Maybe a computer could figure out if the near miss required a panic climb or a gradual increase in speed.





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3D Robotics
Comment by Chris Anderson on July 31, 2010 at 8:47pm
Yikes! Give me P2P air traffic control ASAP...
Comment by Paul Marsh on August 1, 2010 at 5:17am
"we were probably going to die like our aunt. Thought about Major Marcy"

Hi Jack. I'm not getting the references (should I be?), but I'm curious.

Paul
Comment by Paul Marsh on August 1, 2010 at 5:53am
P.S. -- Great shots. I wonder if the FAA wants to see them (point them here!). Glad it was a good outcome.
Comment by Ken on August 1, 2010 at 6:01am
Chris,

There is a sort of P2P system. It has gone through a couple of revisions over the last few decades, from passive to active to cooperative. Commercial airliners have the highest level, small private aircraft have the lowest level (or none). Hopefully we have a few heavy iron pilots on this board who can provide operational (rather than just technical) information.

Meanwhile, wiki TCAS
Comment by Matthew M on August 1, 2010 at 10:17am
Resolution advisory:="Increase vertical climb... PULL UP! PULL UP!" Most TCAS resolution advisories are going to be at a reasonable distance and you do get a gradual resolution advisory. I guess if this some how comes out of no where and you also get some alert suppresion closer to approach. Hard to say from what you've said but Im sure some one will know all about it.

I like that cool flag on the winglet! What airline is that?
Comment by Troy Reabe on August 2, 2010 at 5:35am
There is a new cominuication system that is in use in comercial airlines in Europe and on the Transalantic flights but not yet in the continetal US. it is a text based system where the controler sends the information directly to a display on the lower dash. the message can also be sent to a printer normaly on the Lower dash. The FAA is looking at trying to get this system in the US but it requires the new hardware to be installed in comercal air craft. This will not help if a controler directs two planes too close to one another but it will alow the controler to send messages to both planes at the same time.

On a second note, not all aircraft need to have the latest and greatest gauges.
We could go thru and do a full $100,000 upgrade to the dash of our work planes but it would never get used. Working Part 137 (Agricultral) aviation we do not have much use for the new instrumentation. If we had a TCAS system in those planes the pilot would thro it out the window in about 15 min.

But yes it would be nice to have simpler comunication in airlines or even Part 135 (charter) but every time you increase minimum equipment you increase cost and make it that much harder to stay opperating.
Comment by Ken on August 3, 2010 at 7:43pm
"I like that cool flag on the winglet! What airline is that?"

My money says the "winglet" is a wingtip fence belonging to a Virgin America Airbus A319 or A320.
Comment by Ken on August 3, 2010 at 7:50pm
If you look closely you can also see that the offending "aircraft" is the starship Enterprise, NCC-1701-A having travelled back in time, is damaged and leaking plasma from the warp core. Or not. But I stand by the VA-Airbus. :)
Comment by Matthew M on August 3, 2010 at 8:42pm
Thanks for the info! Though I am intimately familiar with the cockpit and systems of the A320 and most of the other "big iorn" aircraft types due to my flight simulation career. I rarely see the wings unless I happen to be sitting in that row. ;D

Moderator
Comment by Brian on August 3, 2010 at 9:05pm
Ha! The more time changes the more it's the same!

"There is a new cominuication system that is in use in comercial airlines in Europe and on the Transalantic flights but not yet in the continetal US. it is a text based system where the controler sends the information directly to a display on the lower dash. the message can also be sent to a printer normaly on the Lower dash."

Yea, back in the day it was called RADIO TELETYPE! (And you could have a one on one or one to many 'chat' w/other operators at the same time!)

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