About

Welcome to the largest community for amateur Unmanned Aerial Vehicles! 

This community is the birthplace of ArduPilot, the world's first universal autopilot platform (planes, multicopters of all sorts and ground rovers). Today the Pixhawk autopilot runs a variety of powerful free and open UAV software systems, including:

  • PX4, a pro-quality open source copter, plane, rover and VTOL software stack from the Linux Foundation's Dronecode Project
  • ArduCopter, open source multicopter and heli UAV software
  • ArduPlane, open source software for planes of all types
  • ArduRover, open source software for ground-based vehicles

If you are looking for the hardware to diy a drone by your own?

If you find it's hard to get the drone parts with competitive cost?

If you are looking for a drone with light weight and long endurance?

T-Drones is here happy to offer the solutions.

T-Drones M690A 0.5-1kg payload, 60-70mins flight time by battery;
T-Drones M690B 1-2kg payload, 50-60mins flight time
T-Drones M690 folding version , 350*320*130mm size to take away.
 

Any query:

Email: t-drones@outlook.com

What's app:+ 86 15070853230

LinkedIn

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Drones are eyes in the sky for firefighters. They can serve as an essential firefighting tool for people in the fire services, especially in and around urban centers, where a deadly inferno might occur in a highrise building. 

Drone for fire fighting can equip fire officials with the latest technology, and add complementary capabilities to the existing resources such as fire trucks, ladders, specialized suits, etc. Firefighters can now acquire aerial information in a quick, cost-effective manner. 

In 2016, …

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Hey guys,

Nimbus series planes have a new member: Nimbus Pro. It is a professional VTOL(vertical take-off and landing) fixed-wing plane for mapping, aerial survey, and inspection mission. It comes with four lift motors and one fixed-wing motor, which will allow the mapping VTOL to ascend like a helicopter. For the mapping mission, the fixed-wing motor will make the drone fly like a plane.

Fast deploy
Due to its modular airframe design, Nimbus Pro mapping VTOL can be set up in less than 5 minutes by a single man.

Long endurance
The Nimbus Pro survey drone can fly up to 100 minutes with a 6S 25000mAh lipo battery in a single flight.

Big inner space for payload
The mapping UAV comes with a big internal space to accommodate various mapping cameras and payload.

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Drones are efficient and cost-effective in capturing visual data, on an object, or an earmarked piece of land. That is why they have proliferated into many industries, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are now being used for a variety of monitoring purposes. 

Modern drones are highly capable of monitoring. Powered by intelligent software, drones can be flown over the internet, stream live videos, and cover long distances by leveraging fixed wings.

Using such capabilities, UAV service providers can thus deploy drones to monitor the assets of an airport and even long runways and transmit the live video footage to stakeholders sitting far away. 

Note: Learn how …

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FrSky R9|RXSR Pilot Flight Control

The FrSky Pilot series flight controller is an All-in-One module that supports comprehensive flight control functions with pre-installed powerful INAV (The support of other open-source software like Ardupilot and Betaflight are ongoing.) and F.Port 2.0 software. This control system is targeted towards RC hobby enthusiasts who are looking for a complete system combining power management, a powerful graphic FrSky OSD, and plenty of IOs.

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The R9/RXSR Pilot is comprised of a three-layer stack:

1.A mainboard providing power for servos and for a video system with switchable voltages, current measurement and general connectivity (6 full UARTs, I²C, 12 servo/motor outputs, 2 analog inputs, video input/output)

2.A processing board using a powerful STM32F765 at its core,…

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The ongoing pandemic (COVID-19) has taught us many things. Among those lessons is the realization that drones can be used for operations to save people’s lives.

Even before the pandemic, at AirWorks 2019, DJI announced that drones saved the lives of 279 people around the world. The number probably represents a small fraction of documented cases where drones were used as a means for public safety. For example, during the lockdown that followed after the onset of COVID-19, drones helped Indian authorities to contain the spread of the virus by monitoring the streets for unlawful gathering. Read the full case study.

We have just scratched the surface when it comes to commercial drone usage - drones have tremendous potential in disaster management alone.

In a…

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lisa TDrones posted a blog post
If you are looking for the hardware to diy a drone by your own?If you find it's hard to get the drone parts with competitive cost?If you are looking for a drone with light weight and long endurance?T-Drones is here happy to offer the…
Friday
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Rakesh commented on ChasityWhite's blog post FrSky R9|RXSR Pilot Flight Control
"very nice post... thanks for sharing such a nice post . We are one of the best online learning portal in the world. Experienced Faculty,Free Life time video access and many more facilities available with online training courses.

<a…"
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Utsav Chopra posted a blog post
Drones are eyes in the sky for firefighters. They can serve as an essential firefighting tool for people in the fire services, especially in and around urban centers, where a deadly inferno might occur in a highrise building. Drone for fire fighting…
Thursday
Utsav Chopra posted a blog post
Drones are eyes in the sky for firefighters. They can serve as an essential firefighting tool for people in the fire services, especially in and around urban centers, where a deadly inferno might occur in a highrise building. Drone for fire fighting…
Thursday
bastler23 replied to Eric Matyas's discussion Free Music / SFX Resource for Drone Videos - Over 1800 Tracks
"I think it's great that you offer free music. It's perfect for my drone recordings. But at the latest for a music underlay an editing program is necessary. I just read a test about editing programs to find out about the possibilities on the market.…"
Thursday
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Wednesday
Jeremy Haas commented on Jack A Jordan's blog post Agricultural Drones Use Technology for Spraying, Mapping, Pest Control, Seeding, Remote Sensing, and Precision Agriculture
"I have had some farmers call me asking for pest control for large areas of land. I have been looking into using a drone. I know how beneficial they can be for that overall view. This is an awesome blog. Thank you for the information!…"
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Site Rules

"Because $10,000 $5,000 $1,000 is too much to pay for an autopilot, especially one that doesn't do exactly what you want."

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV, colloquially known as a "drone") is basically an aerial robot. As we define it, it is capable of both remotely controlled flight (like a regular RC aircraft) and fully-autonomous flight, controlled by sensors, GPS, and onboard computers performing the functions of an autopilot. Our UAVs include airplanes, helicopters, quadcopters and blimps. Most of them are under five pounds, and some of them (especially the blimps) can be used indoors.

We are focused on non-commercial ("recreational") projects by amateurs, although pros are always welcome too. Reasons to make your own UAV range from a fun technical challenge, student contests, aerial photography and mapping (what we call "GeoCrawling"), and scientific sensing. We are primarily interested in civilian, not military, UAV uses here.

If you're new to all this, start here.

DIY Drones is a community based on the Ning social networking platform, and anybody who registers (it's free and easy) can post their own blog entries like this one on the front page, along with starting discussions in the sidebar at left or uploading videos below that. Your registration gives you the ability to do a lot on the site--so feel free to post anything you think will be of interest to this community!

There are other amateur sites out there, from the discussion forums of RC Groups to individual blogs, but DIY Drones is explicitly built as a social network, which means that the community is as important as the content. We're also focused on the most accessible end of the amateur UAV world, with the aim of potentially including high school students.

This means we emphasize amateur UAV projects that are:

  1. Simple: The aim of this project is to create new amateur UAV platforms, including those that could be used for a FIRST-like contest appropriate for students. While we're at it, we'll make amateur UAV development easier for everyone.
  2. Cheap: The target cost of all of our platforms is less than $1,000. You can buy a very good autopilot system for $10,000, but that's not our approach. Cheaper is better, especially with students and schools.
  3. Safe: We follow the current interpretation of the FAA guidelines on small UAVs. Recreational use (non-commercial), under 400 ft altitude, line of sight, "pilot in the loop" and onboard safety systems that always allow for manual control in the case of malfunction. We're building experimental platforms that demonstrate autonomy and the capacity to do real useful UAV work, but we test them in controlled settings. If you want to fly miles out of sight or map cities, we're going to assume you've got the proper FAA clearance or we don't want to know about it.
  4. Participatory: Share and others will share with you. That means that whenever possible, we open source our code and post it online. Everything on this site is published under a Creative Commons "attribution" license, which means that anyone can use or repost it, as long as they give credit to the original author.
  5. Civil: This is a community site of peers helping each other. Bad behavior, from rudeness to foul language, will be deleted. Generosity and kindness is often rewarded with reciprocal behavior and help.

Here are the full set of Site Policies:
 
  1. Civility is paramount. Treat others with respect, kindness and generosity. Some of our most expert members are people who were once total n00bz but were helped and encouraged by others, and are now repaying the favor with the next generation. Remember the Golden Rule. Don't be a jerk to anyone, be they other members, moderators or the owners. This is not a public park, and you have no constitutionally-mandated right to free speech. If you're creating a hostile or unpleasant environment, you'll be warned, then if it continues you'll be suspended.
  2. No discussion of politics or religion. This is not the place to discuss your views on the wisdom of military use of UAVs, any nation's foreign policy, your feelings about war, or anything else that is inclined to turn into a political debate. It is our experience that the rules for good dinner party conversation--no discussion of politics and religion--apply to online communities, too. DIY Drones aims to bring people together, and we find that discussions of politics and religion tend to polarize and drive people apart. There are plenty of other places to discuss those topics online, just not here.
  3. Ask questions in the discussion forum; inform others in blog posts. Submitted blog posts that are just questions and should have been posted in the discussion forum will not be approved. The moderators may or may not message you with the text so you can repost in the right area. To avoid losing your post, put it in the right place from the start.
  4. Blog posts are for informative topics of broad interest to the community. They must start with a picture or video, so the image appears on the front page on the site and gives a sense of the topic as well as inviting people to click in for more. Videos should be embedded (paste the embed code in the HTML tab, not the Rich Text tab). The post should also include links where appropriate. Don't make people do a Google search for what you're talking about if you can provide a link. 
  5. The Discussion Forum is for questions and tech support. We prefer to do all tech support in public, so that others can follow along. If you have a problem, please describe your particular system setup completely, ideally with a photograph, and pick the right forum tags so that others can find the thread later.
  6. No discussion of military or weaponized applications of UAVs. This site is just about amateur and civilian use.
  7. No discussion of illegal or harmful use of UAVs will be tolerated. Responsible use of UAVs is at the core of our mission. That means conforming with all laws in the United States, where this site is based, and insisting that our members elsewhere follow the laws of their own countries. In addition, we feel that part of our responsibility it to help the relevant authorities understand what's possible with amateur UAVs, so they can make better-informed policies and laws. So we have encouraged all relevant regulators, defense agencies and law enforcement agencies to become members here and even participate to help them do that, and many have. In addition, if we see any discussion of UAV use that we feel is potentially illegal or intended to do harm, we will bring it to the attention to the relevant authorities, and will comply with any legal request they make for information about users (although we don't know much that isn't public; see the next item).
  8. Promote safe flying. Moderators may delete postings that they decide are unsafe or promote unsafe activity. This is a judgement call, since it is also healthy to have public discussion about why certain activities are unsafe, but the decision as to whether to leave a post or edit/delete it is at the moderators' discretion. 
  9. Your privacy is protected, up to a point: This is a social network, so everything you write and post here is public, with certain exceptions: 1) Your private messages are private. Administrators are unable to see them, nor can anyone else other than the recipient. Members must not make private messages public without the explicit permission of everyone involved. 2) Your IP address is private. We are hosted on Ning, which controls the server logs. DIY Drones administrators can only see your username and email address; they cannot see your password and do not have access to your account.
  10. Do not publish personal emails or PMs without permission. This is a violation of expected confidentiality (that's why they're called "personal messages") and is grounds for banning.
  11. Do not type in ALL CAPS. It's considered SHOUTING. Posts in all caps will be deleted by the moderators.
  12. Absolutely no personal attacks. It's fine to disagree, but never okay to criticize another member personally.
  13. Share. Although we are not limited to open source projects, the ones that tend to get the most participation tend to be open source. Don't wait until your code or design is "finished"--post it as it is, and you may find that others will help you finish it faster. The best way to contribute is with your creativity--we love data, code, aircraft designs, photos of UAV projects, videos of flights and build logs. Post early and often!
  14. Keep comments open: Authors of blog posts and discussion threads technically have the option to close their comments or approve them before they appear, but we ask members not to do that. We want to encourage a free flow of conversation and blocking or delaying comments only interferes with that. The Moderators are standing by to ensure the conversation remains on-topic and civil, so please leave your comments open and let them do their job.

ESC for EMAX RS2205 2300kv BLDC

Hey guys!Complete and utter noob here. I am looking for a suitable ESC for the EMAX RS2205 2300kv BLDC mounted on a Martian II 220mm frame. I already have a Pixhawk PX4 2.4.7 and plan on using that. I will be using the drone for indoor videos and/ or target tracking.I had shortlisted the Emax BLHeli Series 30A ESC, but saw a lot of people posting about issues with it(esp. on YouTube). As of now, i need a solution which works out of the box and want to avoid the nitty-gritty of the firmware…

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5 Replies · Reply by Ash!sh Agrawal Sep 11

Best Drone Localization Technique

Hello!I am working on a project where I need a quadcopter to accurately know its location relative to a starting point in a GPS denied environment in the dark.A quick overview of the project:The drone will be mounted on a vehicle in a docking stationWhen prompted, the drone must hover above the vehicle by ~20 mThe drone must be able to accurately locate its position relative to the docking station in the dark without GPSThe drone must also be able to react to movement of the vehicle (very small…

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3 Replies · Reply by Ronald Pandolfi Sep 7

Pixhawk connection issue with I2C plugged in

hi friends,I have a strange issue with the Pixhawk 2.4.8the Pixhawk board gets detected by the Win7 system and also by the Mission Planner when connected via the USB port.but whenever I plug anything into the I2C port ( GPS / I2C Extender etc.) the Win7 machine gives error connecting to the Pixhawk board.the USB gives a “Unknown Device” error and the Pixhawk board fails to get detected by the system.what is causing this?

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1 Reply · Reply by Eagle Wong Sep 2

Open-source drone developer kit

I am a part of the engineering team of a startup company called Zeius.We are currently in development of a drone with gaming capabilities. As we’ve made progress on our internal developer tools we thought the drone community could benefit from these tools as well. We are developing a completely open-source super compact single board computer designed specifically for drones (think of a Raspberry Pi specifically made for drones).In short, we’re looking to reach out to the drone community to see…

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4 Replies · Reply by Max Gilson Aug 31

GIMBAL GIVEAWAY. WIN $1,749 VALUE!

*RULESThere are no country restrictions, the giveaway is open to everyone. Entries must be submitted between Aug 20th, 2020 and Sept 20th, 2020.The result will be announced on Gremsy social channels on Sept 30th, 2020 and the winner will be notified by email within 7 days following the winner selection.*HERE'S HOW TO ENTERWanna win this freaking awesome gimbal? What you need to do:Complete the Entry FormBe sure you’ve entered your information correctly!And remember to answer our questions very…

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FrSky NEW ACCESS ARCHER GR8 receiver

The ARCHER GR8 FrSky receiver features the new ACCESS protocol. ACCESS provides the lower latency and increased performance of our previous G-RX8 receivers. With OTA (Over-The-Air) function support firmware upgrades will be very easy, no more wires. The ARCHER GR8 also has an upgraded high precision variometer that gives pilots more accurate and quicker altitude and vertical speed data. Now you can enjoy more accurate and quicker vario audio feedback from your FrSky ACCESS enabled…

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Win 10 Laptop not seeing Sik radios

I recently switched laptops and now have Windows 10. I installed Mission Planner on my laptop and plugged a mRo SiK Telemetry Radio into the USB port. The radio is not recognized on the com ports but is instead on the "Other Devices" tab in Device Manager as "FT230X Basic UART", the FTDI chip in the radio. When I go to properties it says no driver is installed.I've tried multiple mRo radios and an old 3DR radio, different USB ports, updating Mission Planner, uninstalling Mission Planner and…

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1 Reply · Reply by luss silas Aug 24

Seeking the regional agent

Hey Here,We are sincerely looking for the regional agents worldwide. The agents should qualified for the following requirement:1. We have the simiar market and it would be great if you had some potential customers in our LiDARs' main application: Benewake’s LiDAR sensors are widely applied in silo level monitoring( level measurement), smart parking, drones(altitude holding and assisted landing), autonomous vehicles (collision avoidance),intelligent transportation system, robots, AGV (logistics…

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1 Reply · Reply by luss silas Aug 24

FrSky 2.4GHz ACCESS ARCHER R4 RECEIVER

All of the Archer receivers are hyper-matched with the ACCESS protocol. They not only feature wireless firmware upgrades, increased range, and telemetry performance, the R4 now supports more functions like configurable telemetry power, S.Port/F.Port switching and FLR output. Additional valuable features are under development to unlock the true potential of the ACCESS protocol.FrSky RECEIVER FEATURES:ACCESS protocol with Over The Air (OTA)Tiny and lightweightSupports signal redundancy (SBUS…

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