About

Welcome to the largest community for amateur Unmanned Aerial Vehicles! 

This community is the birthplace of ArduPilot, the world's first universal autopilot platform (planes, multicopters of all sorts and ground rovers). Today the Pixhawk autopilot runs a variety of powerful free and open UAV software systems, including:

  • PX4, a pro-quality open source copter, plane, rover and VTOL software stack from the Linux Foundation's Dronecode Project
  • ArduCopter, open source multicopter and heli UAV software
  • ArduPlane, open source software for planes of all types
  • ArduRover, open source software for ground-based vehicles

7473668286?profile=RESIZE_710x

The 900MHz R9 MM-OTA receiver implements the ACCESS protocol and brings the user improved performance and features. The long range receiver supports wireless firmware updates over the air making binding to receivers even easier. As well as the convenience of checking the current receiver firmware version. The R9 MM’s compact form factor design is also carried over to the OTA version, and the R9 MM-OTA supports inverted S.Port as well.

This receiver works compatible with the new release R9M Lite Pro module,and the other 900MHz modules will also be supported when the ACCESS firmware is available.

SPECIFICATIONS:

Dimension: 16*10*2.8mm (L×W×H)

Weight: 0.7g (without antenna)

Number of Channels:

Non-LBT Version: 4/16CH (Telemetry)

LBT…

Read more…
Comments: 0

This is going to be the 2nd Part of the Recommended Battery Series for FrSky Transmitter X9D Plus Transmitter. Don’t get confused with the title that FrSky X9D 2019 requires different batteries than x9d plus as you might think there are some changes in the battery compartment of it. But that is not the case. in fact, the battery compartment of X9d 2019 is exactly the same as of old Taranis X9d Plus. 

However, there is a special reason why this article is focused on Taranis X9D Plus 2019 rather than focusing on X9d plus in general. It is because X9D 2019 only supports operating voltage between 6.5v to 8.4v, which is basically a 2S lipo or Li-Ion. But, the older x9d plus (SE also) supports a wide range of operating voltage between 6 to 15V which means it can support even a 3s Lipo or Li-ion. 

FrSky Taranis X9D 2019 has also some other difference with older Taranis X9D when it comes to battery…

Read more…
Comments: 0

Some time ago released smallest motorized lens controller suitable to drive advanced lenses. Is drives opto mechanical lens which in combination with USB camera makes lightweight camera Kurokesu C1 PRO X18 with optical zoom of 5.5~95mm. Posibility to change h.264 on board codec parameters makes it suitable for low bandwidth applications.

 

7402682672?profile=RESIZE_710x

Read more…

FrSky 2.4GHz ACCESS ARCHER R4 RECEIVER

7386894065?profile=RESIZE_710x All of the Archer receivers are hyper-matched with the ACCESS protocol. They not only feature wireless firmware upgrades, increased range, and telemetry performance, the R4 now supports more functions like configurable telemetry power, S.Port/F.Port switching and FLR output. Additional valuable features are under development to unlock the true potential of the ACCESS protocol.

FrSky 2.4GHz ACCESS ARCHER R4 RECEIVER FEATURES:

ACCESS protocol with Over The Air (OTA)

Tiny and lightweight

Supports signal redundancy (SBUS In)

Full control range with telemetry

S.Port / F.Port

External battery / device voltage detection

 

FrSky 2.4GHz ACCESS ARCHER R4 RECEIVER SPECIFICATIONS:

Dimension: 30*17*6.2mm(L*W*H)

Weight:…

Read more…
Comments: 0

What is FrSky Receiver PPM Output?

Let us take a look at what PWM & PPM is, along with FrSky Receiver PPM Output in this article. PWM or Pulse Width Modulation has been the de-facto choice for receiver out for decades and for good reason - it was direct, easy and simple to use. But as the need for more channels came necessary, it wasn’t logical to keep adding PWM channels, each taking an extra pin - enter PPM or Pulse Position Modulation which brings in multiple channels into a single pin.

What is an RC signal?

So, how do the servos on your RC plane or the rotors on your drones get the signal to move the rudder or control rod? Obviously from the receivers. So there must be a standard communication “talk” between the receiver and the servos, right? This is called as the RC signal. It is what enables servos or any peripherals such as Flight Controllers to understand what input the receiver is giving…

Read more…

Latest Activity

DIY Robocars via Twitter
yesterday
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @_JonMyer: 🚨Attention DeepRacer's including #UndergroundDeepRacer🚨 Check our our LIVE stream that including @IAM_dbro Take a few moments…
Aug 5
DIY Drones via Twitter
RT @MarvelmindMaxim: Extreme precision for 60 swarming robots. #marvelmind #autonomousrobotics #robotics #swarmrobotics #rtls #ips #indoor…
Aug 3
DIY Drones via Twitter
RT @MarvelmindMaxim: Precise (±2cm) tracking for racing boats and autonomous boats. Works outdoor and indoor. #autonomous #AutonomousVehic…
Aug 3
DIY Drones via Twitter
RT @MarvelmindMaxim: Helping PixHawk folks to fly autonomous quadcopters using PX4 and ArduPilot. https://marvelmind.com/drones/ Equally suitab…
Aug 3
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @chr1sa: The @DIYRobocars @donkey_car virtual AI car race is starting in 15 minutes! Watch it live on Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/mossmann3333 htt…
Aug 1
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @chr1sa: Don't miss our monthly @DIYRobocars @donkey_car virtual AI car race tomorrow at 10:00am PT live on Twitch. Head-to-head racing…
Jul 31
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @sparkfun: Our completed tutorial on building an @NVIDIA Jetson Nano-powered @Sphero RVR gets your bot up and running via teleoperation…
Jul 30
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @SmallpixelCar: Freeway test https://t.co/4V5tV9lhIP
Jul 29
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Very small autonomous cars racing, thanks to an overhead camera: https://control.ee.ethz.ch/research/team-projects/autonomous-rc-car-racing.html
Jul 29
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Jul 29
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Jul 29
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @chr1sa: Don't miss our virtual AI car race this Saturday! Real developers + virtual cars =🏎️🏎️🏎️ Head-to-head battles with thrills, sp…
Jul 28
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Jul 27
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @usashirou1: Jetson nano by Isaac Kaya #jetson https://t.co/Mu1N0CyQkN
Jul 23
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @GPUsolution: JetRacer mady by Iflytek company #JetsonNANO #Nvidia https://t.co/MimTymIwge
Jul 23
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @openmvcam: I love this: Mega or Mini? Image Classification on the 1MB OpenMV Cam H7 by Ish Ot Jr. in OpenMV, Edge Impulse, Internet of…
Jul 23
DIY Robocars via Twitter
RT @RoboticMasters: This is looking pretty good... but still needs a bit more refinement. Pure OpenCV Turning Sign Detection. No Tensorfl…
Jul 23
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Jul 23
DIY Robocars via Twitter
Jul 20
More…

Site Rules

"Because $10,000 $5,000 $1,000 is too much to pay for an autopilot, especially one that doesn't do exactly what you want."

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV, colloquially known as a "drone") is basically an aerial robot. As we define it, it is capable of both remotely controlled flight (like a regular RC aircraft) and fully-autonomous flight, controlled by sensors, GPS, and onboard computers performing the functions of an autopilot. Our UAVs include airplanes, helicopters, quadcopters and blimps. Most of them are under five pounds, and some of them (especially the blimps) can be used indoors.

We are focused on non-commercial ("recreational") projects by amateurs, although pros are always welcome too. Reasons to make your own UAV range from a fun technical challenge, student contests, aerial photography and mapping (what we call "GeoCrawling"), and scientific sensing. We are primarily interested in civilian, not military, UAV uses here.

If you're new to all this, start here.

DIY Drones is a community based on the Ning social networking platform, and anybody who registers (it's free and easy) can post their own blog entries like this one on the front page, along with starting discussions in the sidebar at left or uploading videos below that. Your registration gives you the ability to do a lot on the site--so feel free to post anything you think will be of interest to this community!

There are other amateur sites out there, from the discussion forums of RC Groups to individual blogs, but DIY Drones is explicitly built as a social network, which means that the community is as important as the content. We're also focused on the most accessible end of the amateur UAV world, with the aim of potentially including high school students.

This means we emphasize amateur UAV projects that are:

  1. Simple: The aim of this project is to create new amateur UAV platforms, including those that could be used for a FIRST-like contest appropriate for students. While we're at it, we'll make amateur UAV development easier for everyone.
  2. Cheap: The target cost of all of our platforms is less than $1,000. You can buy a very good autopilot system for $10,000, but that's not our approach. Cheaper is better, especially with students and schools.
  3. Safe: We follow the current interpretation of the FAA guidelines on small UAVs. Recreational use (non-commercial), under 400 ft altitude, line of sight, "pilot in the loop" and onboard safety systems that always allow for manual control in the case of malfunction. We're building experimental platforms that demonstrate autonomy and the capacity to do real useful UAV work, but we test them in controlled settings. If you want to fly miles out of sight or map cities, we're going to assume you've got the proper FAA clearance or we don't want to know about it.
  4. Participatory: Share and others will share with you. That means that whenever possible, we open source our code and post it online. Everything on this site is published under a Creative Commons "attribution" license, which means that anyone can use or repost it, as long as they give credit to the original author.
  5. Civil: This is a community site of peers helping each other. Bad behavior, from rudeness to foul language, will be deleted. Generosity and kindness is often rewarded with reciprocal behavior and help.

Here are the full set of Site Policies:
 
  1. Civility is paramount. Treat others with respect, kindness and generosity. Some of our most expert members are people who were once total n00bz but were helped and encouraged by others, and are now repaying the favor with the next generation. Remember the Golden Rule. Don't be a jerk to anyone, be they other members, moderators or the owners. This is not a public park, and you have no constitutionally-mandated right to free speech. If you're creating a hostile or unpleasant environment, you'll be warned, then if it continues you'll be suspended.
  2. No discussion of politics or religion. This is not the place to discuss your views on the wisdom of military use of UAVs, any nation's foreign policy, your feelings about war, or anything else that is inclined to turn into a political debate. It is our experience that the rules for good dinner party conversation--no discussion of politics and religion--apply to online communities, too. DIY Drones aims to bring people together, and we find that discussions of politics and religion tend to polarize and drive people apart. There are plenty of other places to discuss those topics online, just not here.
  3. Ask questions in the discussion forum; inform others in blog posts. Submitted blog posts that are just questions and should have been posted in the discussion forum will not be approved. The moderators may or may not message you with the text so you can repost in the right area. To avoid losing your post, put it in the right place from the start.
  4. Blog posts are for informative topics of broad interest to the community. They must start with a picture or video, so the image appears on the front page on the site and gives a sense of the topic as well as inviting people to click in for more. Videos should be embedded (paste the embed code in the HTML tab, not the Rich Text tab). The post should also include links where appropriate. Don't make people do a Google search for what you're talking about if you can provide a link. 
  5. The Discussion Forum is for questions and tech support. We prefer to do all tech support in public, so that others can follow along. If you have a problem, please describe your particular system setup completely, ideally with a photograph, and pick the right forum tags so that others can find the thread later.
  6. No discussion of military or weaponized applications of UAVs. This site is just about amateur and civilian use.
  7. No discussion of illegal or harmful use of UAVs will be tolerated. Responsible use of UAVs is at the core of our mission. That means conforming with all laws in the United States, where this site is based, and insisting that our members elsewhere follow the laws of their own countries. In addition, we feel that part of our responsibility it to help the relevant authorities understand what's possible with amateur UAVs, so they can make better-informed policies and laws. So we have encouraged all relevant regulators, defense agencies and law enforcement agencies to become members here and even participate to help them do that, and many have. In addition, if we see any discussion of UAV use that we feel is potentially illegal or intended to do harm, we will bring it to the attention to the relevant authorities, and will comply with any legal request they make for information about users (although we don't know much that isn't public; see the next item).
  8. Promote safe flying. Moderators may delete postings that they decide are unsafe or promote unsafe activity. This is a judgement call, since it is also healthy to have public discussion about why certain activities are unsafe, but the decision as to whether to leave a post or edit/delete it is at the moderators' discretion. 
  9. Your privacy is protected, up to a point: This is a social network, so everything you write and post here is public, with certain exceptions: 1) Your private messages are private. Administrators are unable to see them, nor can anyone else other than the recipient. Members must not make private messages public without the explicit permission of everyone involved. 2) Your IP address is private. We are hosted on Ning, which controls the server logs. DIY Drones administrators can only see your username and email address; they cannot see your password and do not have access to your account.
  10. Do not publish personal emails or PMs without permission. This is a violation of expected confidentiality (that's why they're called "personal messages") and is grounds for banning.
  11. Do not type in ALL CAPS. It's considered SHOUTING. Posts in all caps will be deleted by the moderators.
  12. Absolutely no personal attacks. It's fine to disagree, but never okay to criticize another member personally.
  13. Share. Although we are not limited to open source projects, the ones that tend to get the most participation tend to be open source. Don't wait until your code or design is "finished"--post it as it is, and you may find that others will help you finish it faster. The best way to contribute is with your creativity--we love data, code, aircraft designs, photos of UAV projects, videos of flights and build logs. Post early and often!
  14. Keep comments open: Authors of blog posts and discussion threads technically have the option to close their comments or approve them before they appear, but we ask members not to do that. We want to encourage a free flow of conversation and blocking or delaying comments only interferes with that. The Moderators are standing by to ensure the conversation remains on-topic and civil, so please leave your comments open and let them do their job.

FrSky 2.4GHz ACCESS ARCHER R4 RECEIVER

All of the Archer receivers are hyper-matched with the ACCESS protocol. They not only feature wireless firmware upgrades, increased range, and telemetry performance, the R4 now supports more functions like configurable telemetry power, S.Port/F.Port switching and FLR output. Additional valuable features are under development to unlock the true potential of the ACCESS protocol.FrSky RECEIVER FEATURES:ACCESS protocol with Over The Air (OTA)Tiny and lightweightSupports signal redundancy (SBUS…

Read more…
0 Replies

FrSky Xact Series Micro HV 8.4V Capable Servos HV5201/5202/5203

FrSky Xact series coreless servos utilize all CNC machined aluminum protective case and metal gears, these servos are 8.4V high voltage capable and offer high speed and configurable torque performance. Also, the Xact series servos offer multiple form factors and configurations to fit for different model types and precision usage.Working with the F.Port 2.0 protocol, the telemetry data (like real-time current and voltage) of Xact servos can be achieved and transmitted back to the radio by…

Read more…
0 Replies

[FYI] Webinar - Industrial Applications Utilizing the Gremsy Gimbal & Phase One iXM Camera.

Time: Thurs, September 20th - 8 am MDT.Phase One Industrial together with Air Supply, a UAV Partner, will show you how integration with a Gremsy gimbal can keep you ahead with the latest technology.In this webinar you’ll experience:More in-depth criteria integrating the 100MP camera.Step-by-step instruction, get your system set up quicklyControl and functionality: solid locks, flexible rotation, and direct connection to the flight control system.>>Register link: https://bit.ly/3aiBHXU

Read more…
0 Replies

FrSky TFR4 SB 3/16CH 2.4Ghz S.BUS Receiver FASST Compatible

FrSky Receiver TFR4SB is Compatible with FASST 2.4G: Air Systems (7CH Mode/Multi Mode) & Surface Systems (C1 Mode) Finally an affordable S.Bus reciever. Not only is it affordable, but we offer improved sensitivity and stbility for better comunications with your transmitter. Don't let the lower prices fool you, we are puting out some of the world's best R/C radio today. Features:Compatible with FASST 2.4G: Air Systems (7CH Mode/Multi Mode) & Surface Systems (C1 Mode)SB port is compatible with…

Read more…
0 Replies

2019 FrSky 24CH Taranis X9 Lite Radio Support ACCESS and D16 Mode

As a portable radio, the FrSky Transmitter X9 Lite is a remarkable fusion of traditional radio design with the innovations of the latest ACCESS protocol. The X9 Lite inherits its classic form factor from the FrSky Taranis X9D series remote control, along with completely preserving the comfort of the classic grip design, it also adds a program scroll button adding convenience when navigating the menu further improving the user experience. For beginners, the wired training function is retained,…

Read more…
0 Replies

FrSky DJT-JR 2.4GHz Transmitter Telemetry Module

The DJT telemetry transmitter module is a great choice if your transmiter is compatable with the JR modules. (as well as Turnigy 9x/FlySky 9x/EMAX 9x)The Telemetry Radio System developed by FrSky provides an additional return link that is used for monitoring the Rx’s voltage, poor receiver reception, temperature, location, speed and so on.The module is compatible with both the V8-series (non-telemetry) and the D-Series (telemetry) receivers. Features:Advanced Continuous Channel Shifting…

Read more…
0 Replies

FrSky DJT-Junior 2.4GHz Transmitter Telemetry Module

The DJT telemetry transmitter module is a superb choice in case your transmiter is compatable using the Junior modules. (in addition to Turnigy 9x/FlySky 9x/EMAX 9x)The Telemetry Radio System produced by FrSky offers an additional return link which is used for monitoring the Rx?¡¥s current, poor receiver reception, temperature, location, speed and so forth.The module works with both V8-series (non-telemetry) and also the D-Series (telemetry) receivers.Features:Advanced Continuous Funnel…

Read more…
0 Replies

Battery Failsafe

Is it necessary to use low mah FS if I am using a Low Volt FS? I have my low volt failsafe set but the drone comes back and lands long before reaching low voltage. I think the low mah failsafe could be the cause. I would like to know if there is a downside to using only the low volt failsafe.

Read more…
0 Replies

Hex with ESC's in motor booms

I'm currently building a Tartot X6 and using Hobbywing 40A slim ESC's. They are a little too long to mount under the motor mount and I would like to place them in the carbon arm. Hobbywings website shows the same ESC placed in a carbon tube. I'm just wondering if they will get too hot?Xrotor-PRO-40A-a_776x.jpg

Read more…
0 Replies

Innovative Interesting UAVs

The next “big thing” is always in the spotlight in today’s society.  Many companies now prioritize how their devices will stand out among the standard items in the market, so there is an abundance of innovative UAVs for consumers.We will explore some of these new and interesting drones that break conventional styles. These drones may be in the market or still in production.Mini RC Folding Ball DroneThese drones are in the shape of a basketball or football, and they unfold while flying.  They…

Read more…
0 Replies