About

Welcome to the largest community for amateur Unmanned Aerial Vehicles! 

This community is the birthplace of ArduPilot, the world's first universal autopilot platform (planes, multicopters of all sorts and ground rovers). Today the Pixhawk autopilot runs a variety of powerful free and open UAV software systems, including:

  • PX4, a pro-quality open source copter, plane, rover and VTOL software stack from the Linux Foundation's Dronecode Project
  • ArduCopter, open source multicopter and heli UAV software
  • ArduPlane, open source software for planes of all types
  • ArduRover, open source software for ground-based vehicles

Lithium Ion battery Pack designer utility

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Lithium ion batteries have a higher energy capacity than Lithium Polymer packs, in general. Higher capacity lithium ion packs can be designed if the current draw of the drones are known. We have built a web utility to find the right chemistry of cells to use, from among the hundreds of different cells. 

Input the max weight, and current discharge of the drone and see: 

  • Battery cell configuration (number of cells in parallel and series) 
  • Approximate flight time as compared to current aircraft (without weight change)
  • Battery weight.

Reach out to us shout@rotoye.com to get free access to this utility. 

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3D Robotics

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The PX4 Developer Summit Online 2021

Registration is now open.

Our flagship event is back with an improved format, plenty of space for content on a multi-track schedule, with lots of opportunities to network with the most prominent open-source community of drone developers.

  • Register today with an early bird discount code for $10 tickets
  • Apply today to the Call for Proposals
  • Review the available Sponsorship opportunities

The Dronecode Foundation is proud to be hosting the community for the two-day event September 14-15.

The PX4 Developer Summit is the perfect opportunity to network, learn, and interact with adopters and end-users of our projects. We put together a comprehensive experience for everyone to…

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3D printed truck

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The high cost of good RC truck kits, diminishing need for such kits & the noise of gearboxes made me look elsewhere for a robot platform.  3D printing a truck from scratch, with only a few metal parts still being off the shelf, was the next step.  The only parts which have to be outsourced are the motors, steering servo, & steering knuckles.  Everything else is 3D printed or home made electronicals.  The size was based on the original Tamiya lunchbox.

 

 

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Great post from NASA explaining how the Mars helicopter autopilot works:

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Before each of Ingenuity’s test flights, we upload instructions that describe precisely what the flight should look like. But when it comes time to fly, the helicopter is on its own and relies on a set of flight control algorithms that we developed here on Earth before Ingenuity was even launched to Mars.

To develop those algorithms, we performed detailed modeling and computer simulation in order to understand how a helicopter would behave in a Martian environment.  We followed that up with testing in a massive 25-meter-tall, 7.5-meter-diameter vacuum chamber here at JPL where we replicate the Martian…

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Moderator
 

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Dear Friends,
1 months ago our cubesat satellite "FEES" release in space by Soyouz 2 . The hardware is based of VRBrain 5 architecture , we put in space a STM32F4 micro controller . The first release don't use Ardupilot , hope the next one with your help and our experience could be . After a lot of test and study about the communication in space we found that lora protocol it's a great option for sat to ground and could be ground to space communication . So actually FEES is still in space and continue to trasmit it's position to earth. Now for recived it we are using global opensource network called TinyGS . Now we start we next step that's is try to constantly comunicate with the sat all around the world . So now we need the help of our great community . We need put small ground station around the world for connect our cubesat at any time of day and night.…
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Latest Activity

johnsanju, Ankit Mandal, Andrew Collier and 4 more joined diydrones
47 minutes ago
Matt posted a blog post
Introducing CopterPack - a carbon fiber electric backpack helicopter. First flight video is coming soon!
3 hours ago
Matt updated their profile
3 hours ago
David updated their profile
7 hours ago
Chopper Girl updated their profile photo
yesterday
Betty Jones replied to Jackson Sherpard's discussion Dream Set-Up
"Oh, I would have the most powerful drone, about 1.5 meters in size, in principle, even now, any Florida resident can take a payday loan at https://cashloansnearby.com/florida/tamarac/ and upgrade their drone to the desired level."
yesterday
Andreas Gazis and Ronald Pandolfi are now friends
yesterday
Andrew Stevenson and Mark ODell joined diydrones
Wednesday
Echo G posted a blog post
Lithium ion batteries have a higher energy capacity than Lithium Polymer packs, in general. Higher capacity lithium ion packs can be designed if the current draw of the drones are known. We have built a web utility to find the right chemistry of…
Wednesday
rec updated their profile
Wednesday
rec updated their profile photo
Wednesday
Eric Matyas replied to Eric Matyas's discussion Free Music / SFX Resource for Drone Videos - Over 1800 Tracks
"Greetings Creatives,

This week’s new free music tracks are:

On my Sci-Fi 10 page:

“WEIRD THINGS APPROACHING”
https://soundimage.org/sci-fi-10/

And on my Puzzle Music 6 page:

“BRAIN TEASER 3”
https://soundimage.org/puzzle-music-6/

NEWS

It’s…"
Tuesday
Jake Mahmood is now a member of diydrones
Tuesday
Colum Boyle liked Windjimes's discussion Dual System Redundant Supply Parallel Question
Tuesday
Ramon Roche posted a blog post
The PX4 Developer Summit Online 2021Registration is now open.Our flagship event is back with an improved format, plenty of space for content on a multi-track schedule, with lots of opportunities to network with the most prominent open-source…
Monday
Jack Crossfire posted a blog post
  The high cost of good RC truck kits, diminishing need for such kits & the noise of gearboxes made me look elsewhere for a robot platform.  3D printing a truck from scratch, with only a few metal parts still being off the shelf, was the next step. …
Monday
DexterIsMyHero left a comment on PIXHAWK
"As a noob with a PixHawk 2.4.8, I would try using a free serial port first. My familiarity with Arduinos makes me lean toward serial interface.
I understand "companion computers" connect to the USB port, the one located below the TELEM2 port…"
Monday
Jackson Sherpard left a comment on German Ardu-Group
"Huhu, ich hab die DJI P4P V2.0. Ich würde gerne mal das Projekt Marke "Eigenbau" starten.
Ich liebe einfach Luftaufnahmen. Auch wenn sie nur digital sind, wie in meinem Lieblingsfilm im Vorspann:
https://latenightstreaming.com/en-uk/movie/avatar"
Monday
Colum Boyle liked Eagle View's photo
Monday
Amit Shishodia left a comment on PIXHAWK
"Hiiii

How to send additional analog sensor information from Arduino to Pixhawk?

What is the best way to do it? Can anyone guide me on how I view sensor data on the mission planner?
I can measure analog sensor data in Arduino now i want to transfer…"
Monday
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Site Rules

"Because $10,000 $5,000 $1,000 is too much to pay for an autopilot, especially one that doesn't do exactly what you want."

An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV, colloquially known as a "drone") is basically an aerial robot. As we define it, it is capable of both remotely controlled flight (like a regular RC aircraft) and fully-autonomous flight, controlled by sensors, GPS, and onboard computers performing the functions of an autopilot. Our UAVs include airplanes, helicopters, quadcopters and blimps. Most of them are under five pounds, and some of them (especially the blimps) can be used indoors.

We are focused on non-commercial ("recreational") projects by amateurs, although pros are always welcome too. Reasons to make your own UAV range from a fun technical challenge, student contests, aerial photography and mapping (what we call "GeoCrawling"), and scientific sensing. We are primarily interested in civilian, not military, UAV uses here.

If you're new to all this, start here.

DIY Drones is a community based on the Ning social networking platform, and anybody who registers (it's free and easy) can post their own blog entries like this one on the front page, along with starting discussions in the sidebar at left or uploading videos below that. Your registration gives you the ability to do a lot on the site--so feel free to post anything you think will be of interest to this community!

There are other amateur sites out there, from the discussion forums of RC Groups to individual blogs, but DIY Drones is explicitly built as a social network, which means that the community is as important as the content. We're also focused on the most accessible end of the amateur UAV world, with the aim of potentially including high school students.

This means we emphasize amateur UAV projects that are:

  1. Simple: The aim of this project is to create new amateur UAV platforms, including those that could be used for a FIRST-like contest appropriate for students. While we're at it, we'll make amateur UAV development easier for everyone.
  2. Cheap: The target cost of all of our platforms is less than $1,000. You can buy a very good autopilot system for $10,000, but that's not our approach. Cheaper is better, especially with students and schools.
  3. Safe: We follow the current interpretation of the FAA guidelines on small UAVs. Recreational use (non-commercial), under 400 ft altitude, line of sight, "pilot in the loop" and onboard safety systems that always allow for manual control in the case of malfunction. We're building experimental platforms that demonstrate autonomy and the capacity to do real useful UAV work, but we test them in controlled settings. If you want to fly miles out of sight or map cities, we're going to assume you've got the proper FAA clearance or we don't want to know about it.
  4. Participatory: Share and others will share with you. That means that whenever possible, we open source our code and post it online. Everything on this site is published under a Creative Commons "attribution" license, which means that anyone can use or repost it, as long as they give credit to the original author.
  5. Civil: This is a community site of peers helping each other. Bad behavior, from rudeness to foul language, will be deleted. Generosity and kindness is often rewarded with reciprocal behavior and help.

Here are the full set of Site Policies:
 
  1. Civility is paramount. Treat others with respect, kindness and generosity. Some of our most expert members are people who were once total n00bz but were helped and encouraged by others, and are now repaying the favor with the next generation. Remember the Golden Rule. Don't be a jerk to anyone, be they other members, moderators or the owners. This is not a public park, and you have no constitutionally-mandated right to free speech. If you're creating a hostile or unpleasant environment, you'll be warned, then if it continues you'll be suspended.
  2. No discussion of politics or religion. This is not the place to discuss your views on the wisdom of military use of UAVs, any nation's foreign policy, your feelings about war, or anything else that is inclined to turn into a political debate. It is our experience that the rules for good dinner party conversation--no discussion of politics and religion--apply to online communities, too. DIY Drones aims to bring people together, and we find that discussions of politics and religion tend to polarize and drive people apart. There are plenty of other places to discuss those topics online, just not here.
  3. Ask questions in the discussion forum; inform others in blog posts. Submitted blog posts that are just questions and should have been posted in the discussion forum will not be approved. The moderators may or may not message you with the text so you can repost in the right area. To avoid losing your post, put it in the right place from the start.
  4. Blog posts are for informative topics of broad interest to the community. They must start with a picture or video, so the image appears on the front page on the site and gives a sense of the topic as well as inviting people to click in for more. Videos should be embedded (paste the embed code in the HTML tab, not the Rich Text tab). The post should also include links where appropriate. Don't make people do a Google search for what you're talking about if you can provide a link. 
  5. The Discussion Forum is for questions and tech support. We prefer to do all tech support in public, so that others can follow along. If you have a problem, please describe your particular system setup completely, ideally with a photograph, and pick the right forum tags so that others can find the thread later.
  6. No discussion of military or weaponized applications of UAVs. This site is just about amateur and civilian use.
  7. No discussion of illegal or harmful use of UAVs will be tolerated. Responsible use of UAVs is at the core of our mission. That means conforming with all laws in the United States, where this site is based, and insisting that our members elsewhere follow the laws of their own countries. In addition, we feel that part of our responsibility it to help the relevant authorities understand what's possible with amateur UAVs, so they can make better-informed policies and laws. So we have encouraged all relevant regulators, defense agencies and law enforcement agencies to become members here and even participate to help them do that, and many have. In addition, if we see any discussion of UAV use that we feel is potentially illegal or intended to do harm, we will bring it to the attention to the relevant authorities, and will comply with any legal request they make for information about users (although we don't know much that isn't public; see the next item).
  8. Promote safe flying. Moderators may delete postings that they decide are unsafe or promote unsafe activity. This is a judgement call, since it is also healthy to have public discussion about why certain activities are unsafe, but the decision as to whether to leave a post or edit/delete it is at the moderators' discretion. 
  9. Your privacy is protected, up to a point: This is a social network, so everything you write and post here is public, with certain exceptions: 1) Your private messages are private. Administrators are unable to see them, nor can anyone else other than the recipient. Members must not make private messages public without the explicit permission of everyone involved. 2) Your IP address is private. We are hosted on Ning, which controls the server logs. DIY Drones administrators can only see your username and email address; they cannot see your password and do not have access to your account.
  10. Do not publish personal emails or PMs without permission. This is a violation of expected confidentiality (that's why they're called "personal messages") and is grounds for banning.
  11. Do not type in ALL CAPS. It's considered SHOUTING. Posts in all caps will be deleted by the moderators.
  12. Absolutely no personal attacks. It's fine to disagree, but never okay to criticize another member personally.
  13. Share. Although we are not limited to open source projects, the ones that tend to get the most participation tend to be open source. Don't wait until your code or design is "finished"--post it as it is, and you may find that others will help you finish it faster. The best way to contribute is with your creativity--we love data, code, aircraft designs, photos of UAV projects, videos of flights and build logs. Post early and often!
  14. Keep comments open: Authors of blog posts and discussion threads technically have the option to close their comments or approve them before they appear, but we ask members not to do that. We want to encourage a free flow of conversation and blocking or delaying comments only interferes with that. The Moderators are standing by to ensure the conversation remains on-topic and civil, so please leave your comments open and let them do their job.

Dream Set-Up

Hey,So imagine you had no financial restrictions whatsoever.What would be your wildest dream set-up. I want you guys to really go over the top, but compinents have to be available on the market right now.Let's hear what you got!

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1 Reply · Reply by Betty Jones yesterday

Drone Building Course

Hello Everyone:My name is Ward and I am brand new to the Forum. I am also brand new to drone building and I am looking to design and build my own drones. I did take Electronis Engineering in College about a million years ago (when almost everything…

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3 Replies · Reply by Jackson Sherpard May 5