Distributor

Testing a small thermal imaging camera

I got my hands on a small thermal imaging camera for testing purposes.

I installed it on my hexacopter and took it out for a flight this evening.

Ttechnical data:

resolution: 384 x 288

50 Hz

8 - 14 um spectral range

analog video out

uncooled sensor

I am looking forward to test the new model (second version), which has double the resolution and false-color

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Comments

  • Agreed Ben, this industry is full of "if you have to ask, you can't afford it" ripoffs. Most commercial unmanned offerings can be built in 10 hours for a savings of $20,000.
  • Can this hook up to a DJI Phantom 2?

  • Distributor

    Here is some footage of the second version of the thermal imaging camera

    http://diydrones.com/profiles/blogs/testing-a-small-thermal-imaging...

  • No, I will not do your job for you

  • Thanks I'll stick with my 'inflated price resellers'.

  • I will share the links after you register on my site. :P  If I tell you I have a £10k budget per unit you give me something that costs £10k regardless of its actual worth, I have no way of assessing the value, I have no way of telling if you even do something in my price range.  If you can't give prices that I can choose from and then negotiate on that tells me you are a middleman and your only purpose is to waste what could go towards better sensors or stay in my pocket.

  • The ones that I am looking at all show the price and specs.  How can I tell if your product is even remotely what I am looking for if you don't give either?  It is moronic and you are a timewaster.

  • @Guy there is nothing stopping your competitors from posing as a customer and getting the prices anyway.  You think this gives you an advantage, it doesn't.  The reason this only occurs in niche suppliers is because as soon as someone comes along and does it properly they wipe these tactics (and if you refuse to learn, your business) out.

    You need customers, they don't need you, they can go to anywhere, so it is you that needs to learn how things work. Making things a pita for people to buy from you only means they will be waiting for the first opportunity to jump ship if you have a temporary exclusive.

  • Moderator
    I agree. Pricing that requires a registration, or "step into my office" is NOT new, but certainly outdated.
    Its a method of pre-qualifying a potential customer, but will not work in today's open, connected marketplace.
    If they're worried I might be scared off by the sticker-shock, I probably will be, so they better sharpen their pencils and do something about it!
  • The idea that hiding prices is "common practice" for small businesses and/or that there is any legitimacy to doing so is rubbish. It is done by a tiny proportion of new/newish businesses out of slavish stupidity, ignorance or greed, or at best misplaced arrogance. Any maker/vendor who engages in this should be told in no uncertain teems that they are about to lose a potential customer whenever it is encountered. 

    One of the most frustrating characteristics of getting involved in bleeding-edge technology hobbies or projects is dealing with small new manufacturers and vendors who have no idea how to run a retail business in regard to all sorts of things, such as tech support, providing specs and instructions, shipping issues, pricing, and so on. A fine example of this can be observed close by here. Very, very close by.

    Established "niche" makers and vendors in most any market imaginable, from musical instruments through jewelery, clothing, automobile/motorcycle semi-custom accessories, etc.etc.  who have survived for more than a few moments have few problems disclosing everything, including prices, to anyone who looks.

    If a price is necessarily fluid due to fluctuating component costs, exchange rates and so on the wise vendor simply states that prices may change without notice. That's how it's done by everyone except opportunistic rug-merchant types who like to infiltrate new markets and prey on people who believe practices like this are normal. Don't buy into this.

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