here's some footage which highlights the features found on the

'Maveric', which was on display at the recent SOFIC 2011 event,

which was held in Tampa, FL. SOFLIC stands for "SpecialOperation

Forces Industry Concerence.

 

The Maveric has a flexible monolithic wing made from carbon fibre and

rip-stop nylon, allowing the wing to be bent completely around the fuselage.

The whole aircraft can be stored inside and deployed in less than two minutes

 from a 6-inch diameter tube that resembles a jumbo poster tube. Ripstop

 nylon is only used on part of the wing behind the leading edge. The rest of

the aircraft’s body (including part of the wing) is made from carbon fibre.

 

Views: 141

Comment by kucinkbatu on May 28, 2011 at 1:41pm
wow........

Distributor
Comment by David Skinner on May 28, 2011 at 6:36pm
Very Impressive!!! I did however notice that there was no price mentioned. Maybe the price is an OH&S issue?
Comment by Gord Likar on May 28, 2011 at 7:08pm

One source says $45,000 ea. to US, British, and Canadian military. 

On the  Maveric site they claim to use adaptive washout to improve handling in high winds. Tech specs say "20 kts sustained, 30 kts gusting".  How does adaptive washout make it stable 30kt winds?  Anyone know how this works?

Comment by bGatti on May 28, 2011 at 10:16pm
From what I "read", Adaptive washout means that the wings flex - more specifically, the wingtips flex - reducing lift generally, and roll moment specifically.
Comment by ionut on May 28, 2011 at 10:27pm
Maybe this thing is not so controllable.Flexible wings without control hmmm sounds unstable
Comment by Gord Likar on May 28, 2011 at 11:10pm
Agreed, just trying to wrap my head around how a gust would effect a flexible wing.  I was thinking that a frontal gust might make it pitch up and reduce the washout.  The force of the gust could flatten the wing taking the twist out it.  So less washout, more AoA, lift, drag, and more pitching movement.   Also the roll rate would increase making it more likely to tip stall in turbulence.   Looking at its pictures again, it's more likely that the nylon part could bulge up and twist the end of the wing creating more washout, less AoA, and more stability.  I don't see any ailerons or is the whole ribbed nylon area the aileron?  Certainly is a innovative little beast if it really can handle 30 knot gusts.
Comment by MarcS on May 29, 2011 at 1:41am

Doesn´t look like the wing itself contains any controls. More like they are using elevons plus rudder. Regarding the shortness of the whole plane and the shape of the wing it´s probably designed to perform partly like a flying wing with additional control surfaces... I can´t see any other way to get it to stable flight.

It´s an interesyting design but I´m questioning robustness for "deployment". When you see videos of what a Raven has to withstand for example.... Then this bird is much too sopisticated.

Comment by Not Sure on May 29, 2011 at 3:39am
The Kestrel AP when tuned right is pretty capable in high winds with a high wing loading.  That wing loading wont' exactly be in the trainer/glider type catagories.  It's a pity the design used a folding prop, a fixed prop is more efficient, but obviously the folder needed for the tube packaging concept.

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