Thanks to the widespread application of drone aerial photography, researchers can now more conveniently and timely understand the population changes of many large cetaceans, which allows us to better protect those threatened cetaceans.

 

Thanks to the widespread application of drone aerial photography, researchers can now more conveniently and timely understand the population changes of many large cetaceans, which allows us to better protect those threatened cetaceans.

 

Take Eubalaena australis as an example. Researchers at Murdoch University in Australia are monitoring Eubalaena australis in the greater Australian Gulf in southern Australia with the support of WWF.

 

Right whales are large baleen whales, with adult individuals reaching 13 to 17 meters and weighing 30 to 80 tons. Some extremely large individuals can even exceed 100 tons (the North Pacific has a record of 107.5 tons), second only to blue whales and bow Whale. Although far inferior to the close relatives of bowhead whales, they may also live as close as humans. The right whale is the right whale in English. This is because of its high whale fat content, slow swimming speed, and drifting out of the sea after killing, so it is the best hunting target in the whaling industry in the past. It is for this reason that these docile beasts were on the verge of extinction.

 

Eubalaena australis is the most optimistic of the status of the three species of a right whale. Thanks to decades of protection, it is now a non-risk (LC) species. The total number in the world may exceed 10,000 and its population is A relatively stable read-through that continues to recover.

 

The relatives of Eubalaena australis, the North Pacific Right Whale (E. japonica) and the North Atlantic Right Whale (E. glacialis), are not so lucky, and because of their long hunting history, they have also suffered more from the whaling industry As a result, the population base is small, and human activities such as shipping and fishing in the northern hemisphere have a much greater impact on large cetaceans than in the southern hemisphere. Therefore, the IUCN endangerment levels are all endangered (EN), and the total may be less than a thousand.

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