New Pandora's box of 'personal' drones



They could put your mind at ease - or do very much the opposite.

A new arms race is on and it could change everything from the way we parent to how we get our celebrity gossip.

For the technology currently being used by the CIA to ferret out terrorist leaders in the hills of Pakistan is set to arrive in a neighbourhood
near you - and there's nowhere to hide.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1327343/Personal-rec...


Views: 108


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Comment by Gary Mortimer on November 8, 2010 at 11:21am
Remember in the UK, where the Daily Mail is based there are already rules that prohibit the use of UAS for spying on celebs. Of course the operator would have to be caught, but if they are the rules to prosecute them exist.

Who will dob them in?? Any one of the 70 licenced operators trying to make money legally and with hard won permissions. That's who.

This story is written off the back of the WSJ one and mentioning the FAA has no bearing in the UK!

I see they forgot to mention Mersyside police got themselves into trouble over that UAS arrest as they did not have the correct paperwork from the CAA.

I did find reading the Coronation Street spoiler interesting on the right hand side of the page though. Nice to catch up in Africa ;-)
Comment by Peter Seddon on November 8, 2010 at 11:31am
This report also appeared in the Times on Saturday and Sunday Times in the UK. Seems to me typical journalist sensationalism .

Peter
Comment by Earl on November 8, 2010 at 4:39pm
The media sure knows how to say " The sky is falling...."
Crap, this will bring about such nonsensical rules and regs that the average hobbyist will have to live by.
Earl

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