Parrot releases Ubuntu-powered SLAM development board

From Canonical:

Parrot collaborates with Canonical to launch the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, a new development kit for the creation of autonomous and obstacle avoidance drones and robots. Powered by Ubuntu and ROS (Robot Operating System), it gives developers a familiar environment to prototype solutions such as autonomous driving, 3D mapping, or simply using the on board stereo camera and sensors for data gathering.

Just attach the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk to a drone, plug it into the power source and flight controller and you’ve transformed your drone into an intelligent robot.

The Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk is particularly suited to an environment with no GPS or numerous obstacles where its S.L.A.M. (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) software can be used to help the drone understand and navigate its environment.

With support for Ubuntu and ROS, it uses the most popular and versatile robotic development environment. This means that whilst drones are the primary market for the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, it can be used for a much wider set of “robots”, flying wings, articulated arms and roving robots amongst others. Ubuntu and ROS are the preferred choices for robotics developers and researchers, explaining why Parrot decided to choose to offer the combination as a key component of their development kit.

From a hardware point of view, the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk packs an impressive spec into just 140g, including:

  • NVIDIA Tegra K1
  • Fish-eye stereo camera with a 1500×1500 resolution at 60fps
  • Inertial-measurement unit (IMU)
  • Ultrasound sensor
  • Magnetometer
  • Barometer

 

To top off the list, the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk boasts a HDMI port… just plug it into a screen and you’ll get one of the oddest shaped Ubuntu 14.04 computer you can find! Being able to run an Ubuntu desktop directly from the device is a great way for developers to do quick iterative development directly on the board and test their results literally on the fly.

unnamed

Parrot collaborates with Canonical to launch the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, a new development kit for the creation of autonomous and obstacle avoidance drones and robots. Powered by Ubuntu and ROS (Robot Operating System), it gives developers a familiar environment to prototype solutions such as autonomous driving, 3D mapping, or simply using the on board stereo camera and sensors for data gathering.

Just attach the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk to a drone, plug it into the power source and flight controller and you’ve transformed your drone into an intelligent robot.

Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 10.32.09

The Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk is particularly suited to an environment with no GPS or numerous obstacles where its S.L.A.M. (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) software can be used to help the drone understand and navigate its environment.

With support for Ubuntu and ROS, it uses the most popular and versatile robotic development environment. This means that whilst drones are the primary market for the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, it can be used for a much wider set of “robots”, flying wings, articulated arms and roving robots amongst others. Ubuntu and ROS are the preferred choices for robotics developers and researchers, explaining why Parrot decided to choose to offer the combination as a key component of their development kit.

From a hardware point of view, the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk packs an impressive spec into just 140g, including:

  • NVIDIA Tegra K1
  • Fish-eye stereo camera with a 1500×1500 resolution at 60fps
  • Inertial-measurement unit (IMU)
  • Ultrasound sensor
  • Magnetometer
  • Barometer

 

To top off the list, the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk boasts a HDMI port… just plug it into a screen and you’ll get one of the oddest shaped Ubuntu 14.04 computer you can find! Being able to run an Ubuntu desktop directly from the device is a great way for developers to do quick iterative development directly on the board and test their results literally on the fly.

unnamed

Views: 4207


MR60
Comment by Hugues on September 8, 2016 at 12:18am

This sounds like a great integrated system that combines vision, with sonars, baro and compass sensors, the right computing power and non-proprietary Linux/ROS software stacks, to achieve effective obstacle avoidance.

Would have liked even better long range lidars (like the SF11 from laser developer) instead of sonars but maybe weight and power consumption was an issue?

I have to admit this is the first Parrot product I'd be ready to buy and try and where I could see a widespread use and not only diy'ers.

what's the price ?

Comment by HyperGuy on September 8, 2016 at 2:14am

Amazing how these guys are leading the pace with commercial tech.


Developer
Comment by John Arne Birkeland on September 8, 2016 at 3:14am

Looks like a promising product, but where is the Ethernet and WiFi connectivity?

Without Ethernet how will you be able to use this as a standalone product in a sensible manner, send telemetry, stream video (NVidia K1 has great GStreamer video hardware support) etc?

Comment by Paul Meier on September 8, 2016 at 3:52am

Guess one may use a usb wifi dongle or a usb ethernet dongle

Comment by Paul Meier on September 8, 2016 at 4:00am

... and disappointed it's not the X1 ;(

Comment by Jean-Luc COSSI on September 8, 2016 at 4:33am

This is really good ! but I am also disappointed because it is not TX1 based. We (at Neo-Robotix) are exclusively developing TX1 based apps for professionals for 6 months now, using various sensors. It would be good to have everything in one box.

Comment by Jerry Giant on September 8, 2016 at 5:23am

amazed but not satisfied. i will try to port it to tx1 and build a pibop

Comment by robert bouwens on September 8, 2016 at 8:01am

@jab

the is no need to get an ethernet port ;-)

you have usb 3.0

and it's nice to see what ivan djelic has achieved.
linux as base is set - for shure when you know his activities for ubifs.

Comment by Gary McCray on September 8, 2016 at 11:25am

Fourth Quarter 2016 and no pricing.

The stereo camera is interesting, unfortunately, extracting a 3D point cloud or even basic object navigation information for that matter from a stereo camera is a really computationally intensive business.

I am afraid the little TK1 will be straining its GPUs trying to unravel that

The TX1 would have been much better.

And Sonar - Really!

Sonar is hugely problematic, every kind of noise imaginable affects it negatively and it responds very differently to various surfaces also, use, accuracy and range in air are very limited.

There are very good reasons why we abandoned Sonar.

Still, this is an interesting kit of parts if seriously sub-optimal and I suppose some worthwhile use can be made of it.

At this point I would be paying a lot more attention to Intel's RealSense based robotics and flight controller efforts, especially when they start incorporating the Movidius SOC.

I'd like to see that with a TX1 too, Movidius's SOC seems very nice and low power, but the reall GPU grunt of the TX1 seems like it will still serve real 3D vision needs better.

I am afraid the Parrot S.L.A.M. Dunk is going to miss the basket by the time it is actually available.

Best Regards,

Gary

Comment by Francisco Ferreira on September 8, 2016 at 11:35am

Gary I think it's going to miss the basket by the price alone, I read 1249€...

Comment

You need to be a member of DIY Drones to add comments!

Join DIY Drones

© 2019   Created by Chris Anderson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service